Ultrafast Broadband Speed Tests

The Ultrafast Broadband service was installed yesterday morning. The BT engineer first activated the G.fast service at the BT cabinet in the street not far from my house. He then replaced the phone line’s master socket.

BT Openrach G.Fast socket
BT Openreach G.Fast socket

After connecting the BT Smart Hub X router to the socket,  I logged on to the admin console of the router using my PC. I could see the new download and upload speeds: 329.86Mbps and 49.98Mbps, respectively.

Smart Hub X admin console
Smart Hub X admin console. The status page shows the Downstream (download) and Upstream (upload) sync speeds.

I performed a few quick tests using http://www.speedtest.net  The results vary depending on the connection type (wireless or wired), Wi-Fi adaptor, device type (PC, tablet and phone etc), the OS and other hardware and environmental factors.

iPad (2017)

This supports the supports the 5G Wi-Fi (802.11ac) standard, and it’s cool! The iPad supports Wi‑Fi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac; dual band (2.4GHz and 5GHz).

Performing speed tests on the iPad (2017). Maximum speeds achieved during this test: download 262.77Mbps and upload 47.31Mbps.
Performing speed tests on the iPad (2017) model. Maximum speeds achieved during this test: download 262.77Mbps and upload 47.31Mbps.
Broadband speed tests on the iPad. The first test achieved an amazing 301Mbps download speed.
Broadband speed tests performed on the iPad (2017). The first test achieved an amazing download speed of 301Mbps. Upload speeds were consistently between 45-47Mbps.

Samsung Galaxy Tab S2

This tablet also supports wireless 802.11ac but it’s no where near as fast as the iPad. Still, it achieved an impressive 176.64Mbps download and 48.92Mbps upload speeds. Supports Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac MIMO (2.4GHz/5GHz).

Screenshot_20170914-003955

Motorola Moto G4 Phone

The Moto G4 (Android 7.0) supports up to 802.11n and achieved an impressive download speed of 113Mbps during the test. The G4 supports WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n (2.4 GHz /5 GHz).  The upload speeds also hover around 48Mbps.

Screenshot_20170913-142236

Desktop PC

The performance of my desktop PC was however very disappointing.  I performed a number of speed tests before the UltraFast Broadband upgrade, achieving a maximum download speed of 41.29Mbps. However, after the upgrade to the UltraFast Broadband service, I could only achieve a maximum of speed of just 55.88Mbps.

This is a Windows 10 Pro 64-bit PC with an Intel Core i5 4460 3.20GHz and 16GB RAM.  It has a wired network connection using a pair of TP-Link AV200 powerline adaptors which has a claimed data rate up to 200Mbps.

My Broadband speeds
Desktop PC broadband speeds before the UltraFast Broadband upgrade. Maximum speeds  achieved during testing were: download 41.29Mbps, upload 18.25Mbps
desktop_speeds
Desktop PC broadband speeds after the UltraFast Broadband upgrade. Maximum speeds achieved during testing were: download 55.88Mbps, upload 48.26Mbps

TPlink-AV200 powerline HomePlugs I will investigate the performance issue over the weekend, but I am certain that the poor performance is down to the use of the TP-Link AV200 (PA251) powerline adaptors. These adaptors are now about five year sold.

 

5 thoughts on “Ultrafast Broadband Speed Tests

Add yours

  1. Thanks for your reply – i was also wondering what speed you were getting on previous service, the distance to my cabinet is roughly the sames as yours, it will give me an idea of the performance i can expect,

    1. On my desktop, the speed could vary, but it seemed to max out at around 41Mbps. The connection was via a wired network connection using the TP-Link AV200.

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